Lynne Talley

Position
Distinguished Professor, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Role
Theme 1 Lead
Office Phone
Office
Scripps Institution of Oceanography UCSD, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla CA 92093
Bio/Description

Interests

The general circulation of the ocean and the role of various physical oceanic and atmospheric conditions that affect ocean currents and property distributions, including salinity.

Biography

Lynne Talley focuses on the general circulation of the ocean and the role of various oceanic and atmospheric conditions that affect ocean currents and property distributions.  Her research involves collection and analysis of data from most of the world’s oceans, including the Southern Ocean, relevant to the movement and evolution of heat, freshwater, and water masses, and the formation of water masses, in the context of the underlying ocean dynamics.  In addition to numerous publications, she has published a widely-used graduate level textbook on descriptive physical oceanography, and two oceanographic atlases. Her research and international/national committee work include a focus on ocean climate variability/change. She has played a leadership role in scientific planning and execution of international programs, including the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) of the 1990s and the CLIVAR/CO2 Repeat Hydrography Program of the 2000s to present, and is a Lead Author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (AR4 and AR5) chapters on ocean observations.  Dr. Talley is also a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Meterological Society, the American Geophysical Union, and the Oceanography Society.  She is also the winner of the AMS Henry Stommel Research Award and the EGU Fridtjof Nansen Award.

Dr. Talley serves as Leader of the SOCCOM observational program (Theme 1) and her research group is involved directly in float, hydrographic and satellite data analysis, interfacing with the Southern Ocean State Estimate and data-model comparisons.